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Terai

Terai (Nepal)

Practical information about Terai

  • Family
  • Encounters with locals
  • Nature Reserve / Wildlife Observation / Safari
  • Countryside
  • River
  • Culture (paddy field, coffee, tea ...)
  • Horse
  • Handicraft
  • Sustainable Tourism
  • Essential
5 / 5 - 2 reviews
How to get there
6hrs by bus from Kathmandu
When to go
From October to May
Minimum stay
2 to 3 days

Reviews of Terai

Simon Hoffmann Travel writer
193 travel articles

TeraÏ is a region situated in the south of the country. Being on the Nepalese/Indian border it's home to Taru ethnic groups.

My suggestion:
Make sure you have a good insect repellent to hand. Although the area has been treated with DDT, it's still riddled with bloodthirsty mosquitoes.
Summary:

People often think that Nepal's landscape is entirely taken up by the Himalayas and little else. Nothing could be further from the truth, as it does indeed have its fair share of lowlands. Which is the case with TeraÏ. An immense plain, covered in jungle and crossed by numerous rivers, Teraï is home to severalrare species including the Indian Rhinoceros and Bengali Tiger.


The Chitwan and Bardia National Parks are two areas where they're found and I have to say that the elephant ride I took in the former was one unforgettable memory of my time in Nepal. Culture also plays a role, as Teraï was where Buddha was born - in Lumbini in 623BC. This region is perfect for family holidays.



*After the devastating earthquakes that shook Nepal in April and May 2015 the country is slowly getting back on its feet. This article was written before these catastrophic events occurred.

Paddy fields in Teraï, southern Nepal
Clemence Zisswiller Travel writer
33 travel articles

A region situated in the South of Nepal, the Terai covers part of the Great Plain of the Ganges.

My suggestion:
A high risk area for malaria. For peace of mind avoid the rainy season, or consider medication if needed.
Summary:

An alternative to the visits to the North of the country, I was seduced by the wildlife, flora and authentic culture of the Terai.

The Chitwan National Park constitutes one of the essential stopovers of the destination. Wild Elephants, horned Rhinoceros, Bengal Tigers, Bears, Monkeys and a wide variety of birds live together in this vast, natural reserve of 93,200 hectares. The 'walk in the jungle' is certainly a treat for the fearless.

The Terai also forms the territory of the Tharu community. Whilst horse riding, I went through a multitude of villages still a little jaded by tourism. Clay walls and thatched roofs blend into an abundant nature. Between the dwellings, huge Buffalo with soft faces look happy to stop and have their photos taken.

If you want to lengthen your stay in the Terai, do not hesitate to visit Lumbini, considered the birth place of Buddha. The site is an important place of pilgrimage and the opportunity to soak up the Buddhist philosophy.

Fans of scenery, lovers of nature, head to the Terai!

Horned Rhinoceros in the Chitwan National Park.
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